Where MLK and Coretta met and studied, a memorial will rise

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Racial Injustice MLK Monument

This artist’s rendering provided by MASS Design Group illustrates a proposed monument entitled “The Embrace,” consisting of four 22-foot-high intertwined bronze arms. As cities and states continue to grapple with the legacy of controversial monuments, Boston is moving forward with a major effort commemorating Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King.

BOSTON — A memorial honoring Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King is moving forward in Boston, where the civil rights couple met and studied in the 1950s.

Organizers are building what they say will be the country’s largest memorial dedicated to racial equity at the site of a 1965 civil rights rally that MLK led on the city’s historic Boston Common.

This artist’s rendering provided by MASS Design Group illustrates a proposed monument entitled “The Embrace,” consisting of four 22-foot-high intertwined bronze arms.

Organizers say fabrication of the towering bronze sculpture is expected to start in March.

Imari Paris Jeffries, the executive director of the group King Boston, said the effort also includes an economic justice center and annual racial equity festival in Boston.

He hopes to demonstrate how public works can serve as a call to action following the national reckoning on racism sparked by George Floyd’s killing last year.

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