NYC lawmaker talks scaffold safety after pedestrians injured by falling scaffolding

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MANHATTAN — Before Sunday morning’s scaffolding collapse in SoHo, City Councilman Ben Kallos called for changes to the city’s scaffolding regulations.

“I don’t want to say the sky is falling, but literally, the scaffolding is now falling,” Councilman Kallos said in an interview with PIX11 News.

“I introduced legislation in the City Council that anytime you put up scaffolding, you have seven days to start the work, get the work done within 3-6 months, and then get the scaffolding down, otherwise the city steps in.”

Kallos says the legislation he introduced has been debated amongst City councilmembrs and now he’s in negotiations with the Mayor’s office to push for final approval.

“Every New Yorker is tired of scaffolding. It’s one of the top issues that people just hate about the city,” Kallos said.

Real estate industry executives say it’s not cost effective to erect scaffolding, then take it down all while they continue to develop a property.

The Department of Buildings is investigating scaffolding that collapsed Sunday at the corner of Prince Street and Broadway in SoHo Sunday, injuring five people.

If you ever find yourself in this kind of crisis, Dr. Nicholas Genes of Mt. Sinai Medical Center says it’s important to resist the urge to simply pull people out of the mess.

“You want to make sure they are awake and alert and can speak about their condition,” said Dr. Genes.

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