NYPD Chief Monahan says crime is up during pandemic, with nearly 1,000 social distancing calls daily

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APRIL 21, 2020 - NYPD CRIME STATS
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NEW YORK — With New York streets practically empty compared to the bustling streets we’re used to, crime isn’t on the decline, according to new data from the NYPD.

In New York City, homicides, burglaries and automotive grand larceny are all up from this time last year.

APRIL 21, 2020 - NYPD CRIME STATS

And according to NYPD Chief of Department Terence Monahan, those numbers are even higher when you look back beginning on March 12, what he called the beginning of this new normal.

Murders are up 20%, he said.

In part, he attributed the rise in property crime to businesses being closed and people still on the streets taking advantage of it, adding that businesses are going through enough during this time and shouldn’t have to reopen their businesses to find they’ve been burglarized.

He also said the department has seen repeat criminals with prosecutions deferred due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

He called it a problem, but one the department is addressing.

In his interview with PIX11, Monahan also said the NYPD is receiving about 1,000 calls per day related to social distancing. While these usually result in a conversation and education, there have been a few instances of greater criminal activity that have resulted in summonses or arrests, he said.

While the health of the NYPD is improving, more than 4,700 NYPD members remain out sick — that’s down from more than 7,000 at its peak.

Thirty-one members of the NYPD have died from coronavirus, and 41 are currently hospitalized.

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