Smart thermometers aim to stop the spread of the flu in schools

NEW YORK — “No-one wants to see their kids sick. They’re so sad and uncomfortable,” said Ariella Tabick, a parent and teacher at Manhattan Star Academy on the city’s upper west side.

And that’s why parents and school nurses are using smart thermometers to help keep the flu from spreading in classrooms.

“What we can do now is preventative measures like cleaning, and making sure those who can get the flu shot, get the flu shot,” said Phoebe Sun, a nurse at the special education school.

“In this kind of population of kids, not only are their peers going to get sick, staff as well.”

The school is one of many in NYC and across the country enrolled in the FLUency program, where parents are given a smart thermometer, and both parents and nurses can keep track of students symptoms through an app.

“You can choose symptoms in the app that your child may be feeling,” said Sun.

“With that information I’m able to ask the teachers are you cleaning your classrooms, are you cleaning the toys, or I could send alerts to parents about it.”

In some cases masks may be given out, or kids may be sent home.

Doctors say some signs your child may be getting the flu include low energy, body aches, a cough, runny nose and a fever.

They say if you do have the flu, some things you can do to stop it from spreading: cover your cough with your elbow, clean your hands with soap and water and sanitizer, and contain your germs by staying home if you are sick.

Parents Friday say FLUency and smart thermometers work, too.

“We can all see if someone else is getting sick and make decisions if we want our kids in school or daycare that day,” said Tabick.

Click here for more information on how you and your kids can fight the flu.

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