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First section of NYC subway opened 115 years ago this weekend

MANHATTAN — Riders will have a reason to celebrate and probably also complain this weekend.

The first rapid transit subway section opened on October 27, 1905. It ran 9 miles from City Hall to Harlem. From there, the transit system grew into what it is today.

A record number of improvement and maintenance projects are in progress and $50 billion worth is planned for the next 5 years.

Ridership on subways and buses has been on the increase, after declining the past few years. There are more than 6 million swipes a day currently.

More than 41,000 transit workers help keep the subways and buses moving. 74,000 people work for the MTA, which now also includes railroads, bridges and tunnels.

MTA NYC Transit has created some events to help riders understand and celebrate the system and the milestone.

New York Transit Museum will have special events, displays and operating hours this weekend. They will also showcase some historic photos at the museum in Downtown Brooklyn and throughout the system on the screens in stations along the original Interborough Rapid Transit Route. Those stops are now positioned along what is known as the Lexington Line (4/5/6) and Broadway-7th Avenue (2/3)

Click here to find information about "Subway Day."

The Nostalgia Train will run on Sunday.

NYC Transit says the public will be able to be part of the IRT’s first run with Lo-V rides back and forth from Times Square-42 Street to 96 Street between 12:30 and 4 p.m.

Departures from Times Square Uptown 1/2/3 platform will be 12:30, 1:30, 2:30 and 3:30 p.m. making stops at 72 St and 96 St where customers will depart the train and head to the downtown platform if they want to make the return trip.

Departures from 96 Street will be at 1/2/3 and 4 p.m., stopping at 72 St and terminating at Times Square.

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