Gov. Cuomo signs bill establishing 9/11 Remembrance Day

ALBANY — New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed legislation into law on Monday establish an official day of remembrance for the horrors that occurred on September 11, 2001.

September 11th Remembrance Day will now be marked by a brief moment of silence in public schools across the state to “encourage dialogue and education in the classroom.”

The bill adds that it wants to “ensure future generations to have an understanding of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and their place in history.”

The law takes effect immediately.

“9/11 was one of the single darkest periods in this state’s and this nation’s history, and we owe it to those we lost and to the countless heroes who ran toward danger that day and the days that followed to do everything we can to keep their memory alive,” Cuomo said. “By establishing this annual day of remembrance and a brief moment of silence in public schools, we will help ensure we never forget — not just the pain of that moment but of the courage, sacrifice and outpouring of love that defined our response.”

“I am grateful for Governor Cuomo’s approval of my 9/11 observance bill,” said State Sen. Senator Joseph P. Addabbo, Jr. “I am hopeful that this new law will mean that the significance of the tragic events of September 11th, whether it be the loss of loved ones or the largest rescue operation our nation ever witnessed, will be forever acknowledged by school students too young to have witnessed this life-changing day.”

“Students graduating from high school as part of the class of 2019 were just newborns during the terrorists attacks of September 11, 2001 and soon enough there will be no students in the national public school system born at the time of 9/11,” said Assemblymember Stacey Pheffer Amato. “By mandating a brief moment of silent reflection every year, we may ensure that future generations will better understand this day and its significance in our history. Governor Cuomo understands the importance of educating our children about our state and country’s history.”

“I applaud him for signing this bill into law and for his continued partnership,” she added.

The attacks on 9/11 were the worst on American soil, killing 2,996 people. Many have died, including first responders, since due to effects from being in the vicinity of the building.

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