Back to school: Fostering anti-bullying practices

NEW YORK — As students get ready for school, an alarming statistic is raising concern among society and parents alike: 1 out of 5 students report bullying in school, which could lead to depression or suicidal thoughts.

Despite the growing concern, there is currently no federal anti-bullying law.

After her 13-year-old son died by suicide, one Staten Island mother made it her mission to end bullying.

Now, she's taking her fight to Washington D.C., fighting for a national anti-bullying law named after her son, who would have been 16, Danny's Law.

She's not the only one trying to fight the attempted suicides among the youth. Steve Simpson released "The Teenage and Young Adult Survival Handbook" to help young people get through tough times.

Click here to find out New York State's anti-bullying laws and policies. 

New York City's Department of Education is practicing "Respect for All" where schools have the opportunity to help students and communities gain a better understanding of diversity and foster anti-bully practices. For more information, click here. 

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, contact the U.S. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255). It’s a free, 24/7 service that offers support, information, and local resources. You can also click here for additional hotlines within the tri-state area and the nation.

Depression and suicidal thoughts are often exhibited in many ways. Warning signs for suicide can include, but are not limited to, talking about wanting to die; conveying feelings of hopelessness, worthlessness or being a burden; and displaying extreme moods.

If someone you know exhibits warning signs of suicide, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention advises that you do not leave the person alone, call a prevention hotline, and take the person to an emergency room or seek help from a medical or mental health professional.

For more information on suicide prevention, including additional resources and warning signs, you can visit the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s website.

AlertMe
Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.