Gov. Cuomo signs equal pay law ahead of US Women’s ticker-tape parade

NEW YORK — As New York City celebrates the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team’s ticker-tape parade, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed an equal pay bill into law.

“If you don’t pay women what you pay men, then you have no business in the state of New York,” he said.

The law eliminates a “loophole” allowing gender discrimination in pay for the same jobs.

"There is no rationale why women should not get paid what men get paid. These are women's soccer players, they play the same game as the men's soccer players, and they play it better - so if there is any economic rationale, the men should get paid less than the women," Governor Cuomo said.

"New York will continue to lead the way forward and stand in solidarity with women and girls in every corner of this state. By signing this legislation, we are not only doing the right thing, we are also doing the moral thing and equal pay for equal work is now the law in the State of New York."

Megan Rapinoe, USWNT co-captain, is one of the 28 players who sued the United States Soccer Federation alleging gender discrimination.

The federal class-action lawsuit against the soccer federation alleges the men's national team earns more than the women's team, even though the women play more games and win more matches.

Rapinoe said the issue is about "so much more than the money."

"It's really more about the investment in the game. Is the investment equal? We're talking marketing dollars and branding, investment in the youth, investment in the players, investment in the coaching staff. I don't think that that's there. I don't think that that's ever been there."

She said the men's side of sports in general is seen as "this exciting opportunity, business opportunity that needs to be invested in."

"The women's is like, 'How cheap can we do this while sort of keeping them happy?'" she said.

CNN contributed to this report. 

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