Someone may be intentionally disrupting commutes by pulling subway emergency brakes

NEW YORK — Thousands of New Yorkers may have been late to work Tuesday because emergency brakes were pulled on their trains.

The MTA believes a group of people may be intentionally activating the emergency brakes. This is something officials say may have been going on for years.

“We were reluctant to discuss because of copycats," MTA chairman Pat Foye said.

But now the MTA wants to enlist the public’s help in finding the people responsible.

Foye said the MTA needs to be able to ban people who cause disruptions.

"We suspect someone has intentionally disrupted thousands of commutes on the 2/3 lines today by activating multiple trains’ emergency brakes," NYCT Subway tweeted. "If you see any suspicious behavior, please @ or DM us details ASAP, including car #, so we can get trains back on schedule."

People have been charged with criminal tampering in the past after intentionally pulling brake cords to disrupt commutes.

"Riders are not allowed to obstruct movement of trains by means of preventing subway doors from closing, activating the emergency brake cord in a non-emergency or other interference that will create delays or accidents," according to the New York City Transit Rules of Conduct.

People who disrupt train service can be fined.

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