Congestion pricing moves closer to reality

NEW YORK — It looks like congestion pricing is on step closer to getting the green light after Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie announced he has the votes to approve the mayor's campaign to fix the subways with new tolls in Manhattan.

The multi-billion dollar plan proposes to tax vehicles entering south of 61st Street in Manhattan.

If passed, the congestion pricing would be the first city in the United States to introduce the price hike.

The details of the exact cost of the toll are still being ironed out.

On Monday, Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie told reporters that the Assembly was ready to move forward with congestion pricing.

The average price for commuters coming over the East River bridges from the boroughs or suburbs could be over $11 during rush hour.

The tax would take effect in two years.

However, there will be exemptions for those with disabilities, people coming into Manhattan for medical appointments, low-income drivers and emergency vehicles.

The added revenue of about $14 billion would go to fund the city’s deteriorating public transit system.

Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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