Imprisoned Brooklyn man, 24, suffered chest pain before his death: DOC

The 24-year-old Brooklyn man who unexpectedly died Monday at Greene Correctional Facility in Upstate New York appears to have died from sudden cardiac arrest, according to the Department of Corrections and Community Supervision.

Anthony Myrie

Anthony Myrie died Monday, less than three months after the start of his seven-year sentence on a drug charge. DOCCS spokesman Thomas Mailey issued a statement Sunday “given the abundance of misinformation in circulation.”

Myrie spoke to his wife just hours before his death.

“He seemed worrisome like he didn’t want to get off the phone and I kind of tried to pry to see what was wrong,” she told PIX11 previously. “He said it was like nothing that he couldn’t handle.”

Later, an inmate called and told her Myrie had been put in solitary confinement. So she called the prison.

“Then they called me back later to tell me he’s in critical condition,” she said.

Myrie had been involved in a three-on-one fight with other inmates, prison officials said. Correction officers stopped with the fight.

“No officers used force at any time,” Mailey said.

Medical staff examined Myrie after the fight and found no injuries, Mailey said. As he was being escorted to a holding area, Myrie complained of chest pain and was brought back to the medical unit.

Myrie collapsed, unconscious and unresponsive, officials said.

“At that point, medical staff began emergency response and called for outside emergency medical services,” Mailey said. “He was transported by ambulance to Albany Medical Center for further treatment where he was, ultimately, pronounced dead.”

His official cause of death has not yet been determined.

But Myrie’s grandmother is confused over his death.

“I don’t know how he died,” Gloria Parker told PIX11 previously. “He was healthy.”

Myrie isn’t the only inmate to die in recent months at Green Correctional Facility. Delmus Tanner Jr. died there last November.

New York State Police are investigating both deaths.

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