Queens Marine accused of crime spree caught on video

NEW YORK -- Naquan Clark, a Marine Corp reservist from Queens, was already facing felony assault charges in Bridgeport, Connecticut, when he walked onto the lot of Ecars in Brooklyn six weeks ago.

Ecars specializes in the sale of used luxury vehicles. Clarke, 22, told the salesman he was interested in the 2018 Range Rover priced at $80,000. Ecar’s security camera’s show him the salesman opening the car with the keyless fob. He didn’t know that Clarke apparently had a computer in his backpack that detected the code when the fob was pressed.

The cameras also show Clarke returning to Ecars that night. No one was around as he used the fob, made with the stolen code, to open the Range Rover. Once inside, he plugged into the vehicle’s internal computer, pressed the start button and drove the Rover off the open-air lot.

The theft was reported to the NYPD on Oct. 31. Ecar’s owner Arik Lev says it took 10 hours for an officer from the nearby 67th Precinct to respond.

The cop filled out a report and said it would be given to a detective to handle. Lev waited two weeks and heard nothing from the police. So he called PIX11.

“Do the police know you have the video?” I asked him. “Yes, 100 percent” Lev answered.

“Did you give the police the video?”

“No, no one asked and no one came to the dealership” an obviously frustrated Lev told me.

We contacted the NYPD and a detective immediately asked Lev to see the video. But the owner, tired of waiting, posted a reward on the internet, offering $5,000 for information on the thief and $10,000 for info on the location of the Range Rover.

One of the many tips they got led a group of Lev’s employees and friends to the SUV parked at a Pep Boys lot on Utica Avenue in Brooklyn—where Clarke allegedly worked. They called the police. Lev says Clarke ran when he saw them, though they were able to secure the car, with the help of officers from the 63rd precinct.

Clarke got away and incredibly, just four after the Range Rover was recovered, he returned to Ecars at night. Surveillance video shows him using an electronic device, apparently trying to open the Range Rover, which was back on the lot, but fortunately, Lev had changed the lock’s code

Clarke was arrested last week by the NYPD in Brooklyn. He was charged with Grand Larceny Auto—a felony. Lev was shocked when the judge released Clarke without any bail. He is due back in court next week.

Perhaps the judge was unaware that Clarke was already out on bail for a crime in February, when Bridgeport Police officers stopped him because of a stolen license plate. When the police ordered him out of the car, he refused and stepped on the gas, speeding away, dragging two of the officers 30 feet. Their injuries were not life threatening.

He got away, but a month later, in March, the U.S. Marshals raided his Queens home and arrested Clarke. Charged with felony assault, the judge set bail at $150,000. Clarke had to pay 10 percent and was released pending trial in January 2019.

For now, Naquan Clarke remains a free man, despite facing felony charges for two separate crimes. We’ll keep you posted.

If you’ve got a story for me, send an email to whatashame@pix11.com.