Kids at college prep school in Manhattan are learning life lessons through dog training program

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NEW YORK—Meet Flint.

He's a 6-year-old Kerry Blue Terrier.

And he's great with kids.

Flint and his owner, Barbara, work with kids and teens who have special needs or need theraputic help for social, emotional or learning disorders.

"They get such a sense of positive feelings, good feelings about themselves as people. That's pretty important," Wolf-Dorlester said.

But on the day I met up with them, they were working with a group of kids from the Trevor Day School in Manhattan.

These lucky students get to work with Flint as part of an after-school program on dog training.

In addition to learning how to train a dog or teach new tricks, they also learn the proper way to handle a dog.

"I never knew that dogs feel attacked when they are petted on the head. And they don't like when the owner walks around them," one student said.

And while Flint is learning new tricks and commands, Barbara says the kids are learning too.

"All children really learn respect for animals. They learn how to treat an animal in a positive way. That the best way to have a good relationship either with an animal or a person is by being kind and sensitive,"  Wolf-Dorlester said.

For me, I was looking for a little TLC that day.

But I think I may have barked up the wrong tree.

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