World Trade Center transit hub transformed in time for 9/11 anniversary

MANHATTAN — The Cortlandt Street station at the World Trade Center re-opened on Saturday—three days before the 17th  9/11.

"It took long but a its beautiful," said Nina Doumbia, a commuter who relies on mass transit to get to and from work.

Doumbia says she remembers the days after the 9/11 terror attacks and how it destroyed the Cortlandt Street station. She says she feels Saturday's reopening is the final piece to the rebuilding efforts that has spanned 17 years.

"This is definitely the best thing ever," Doumbia said. "We don't have to walk to the 4 train and then walk to the ferry. It's just simple."

The new station is fully accessible, has fewer columns for easier customer flow and is also air-conditioned. It is equipped with electronic signage displaying real-time service information.

The station also features mosaic tiles with text from the Declaration of Independence and the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, done by artist Ann Hamilton.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority is calling this station the blueprint for the future.

"We can have a state of the art transit system in under ten years," NYC Transit President Andy Byford said.

The opening of the new station will provide for a better commute and a better experience, but for Shaun Diamond it is more than that.

He was just a kid on 9/11 but will never forget the way New Yorkers and the country responded.

"It is exciting because I was actually five years old when it happened and I was in Manhattan when the World Trade Center was actually coming down," Diamond said. "It's just cool to see everything new and reformed."