M.C. Esher exhibit brings mind-bending artwork to Industry City in Brooklyn

BROOKLYN — It's not an optical illusion. For the first time ever,  the works of artist M.C. Escher are on display in New York City. And if you've every questioned your perspective on reality, then you'll probably love the work of M.C. Escher.

"Young people, older people, hipsters, millennials, everybody loves it," said Exhibition Manager Johanna Guttmann.

Escher: The Exhibition and Experience, produced by Arthemisia, opened earlier this month in Industry City.

"The industrial aspect of it works very well with the graphics and the graphic art, we thought it would be a great fit," said Guttmann.

Despite his unbelievable talent, Escher didn't see himself as an artist, but rather a mathematician. And the inspiration is evident in much of his work.

"A lot of things that could not be expressed mathematically that are sort of abstract concepts actually come alive in his works."

Escher was heavily inspired by the Italian landscape and fascinated with repeated interlocking patterns. He challenged perspective by creating geometrical paradoxes and impossible shapes.

"This is really an intersection of math, art, science and architecture. Everything comes together in Escher."

In addition to observing 200 of Escher's works you can also experience them from the artist's perspective through several interactive components at the exhibit. You can seemingly grow and shrink in the Relativity Room or Expand your mind in the Infinity Room.

"That's absolutely something that really distinguishes what this exhibit is from other exhibits. There are a lot of interactive manipulative things that you can play with that really deal with perception."

His mind-bending work brings many mathematical paradoxes to real life scenes which has helped inspire so many other creatives from Pink Floyd, to the Simpsons.

"So we have Escher in pop culture, Escher in design, fashion, advertising, television, movies, comic books, it's in everything."

You can challenge your own perspectives at the exhibit which is open 7 days a week and runs through February.

For more information head over to https://www.eschernyc.com/