Foods to kick off a lucky New Year

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It’s almost time to ring in the New Year.

All that champagne guzzling and celebrating could work up an appetite —So if you’re feeling hungry and a bit superstitious, here are some foods that many believe will kick off a lucky streak in 2018.

  • In Spanish and Portuguese cultures, eating 12 grapes at midnight symbolizes the 12 months of the New Year.
  • Before we get to midnight, let’s talk dinner. Pork should be on the menu. Some think that because pigs are plump, they are a symbol of prosperity.
  • Pomegranate seeds are also supposed to be lucky and bring good fortune.
  • Come breakfast the morning of New Year’s Day you’re going to want to grab ring-shaped foods. The circular shape apparently represents the year coming in full circle.
  • Moving onto lunch- roast fish. Fish are supposed to be lucky because their scales resemble coins. Fish swim in schools, which represents good fortune and they swim forward, which is a sign for progress.
  • In Japan, long, buckwheat soba noodles are a symbol for having a long life. However, they’re only supposed to be lucky if you eat them without chewing or breaking them.
  • To make more money in 2018, bite off some greens. Many believe they resemble paper money to bring some luck to your bank account.
  • If you’re in the south, you may see people eat black-eyed peas for the holiday. They are considered to be lucky because they look like coins. In Brazil and Italy, people have been eating lentils all the way back to the Roman times for a similar reason.
  • Another food you should eat? Cake. According to Greek tradition, you bake a coin into a cake, usually a lemon flavored one, and whoever finds the coin will be lucky in the coming year.

Happy eating!

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