Here’s what commuters can expect Tuesday after the subway attack

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NEW YORK — Commuters should face a typical morning commute Tuesday, other than the presence of increased security, a day after a bomb went off in a tunnel linking two of NYC's busiest transit hubs in an attempted terrorist attack.

Six million people ride the subway every day and a quarter million ride buses daily into the Port Authority Bus Terminal. Much of that came to a halt after an explosion Monday morning in an underground walkway connecting the Times Square shuttle and the Nos. 1, 2 and 3 subway line.

Trains bypassed Port Authority Bus Terminal and Times Square for a time, but lines were "totally up to speed" about two hours after the explosion, MTA Chairman Joe Lhota said.

The passageway connecting Port Authority and Times Square was reopened early Tuesday.

The Eighth Avenue entrance to the Port Authority Bus Terminal’s north wing, between West 41st and West 42nd streets, remains closed, but two other entrances to the wing are open.

Trains, buses and terminals appear to be back to normal otherwise, but commuters are being reminded by city officials to be alert.

"There’s six million people that ride the train every day. It’s going to take everybody to have their eyes open, pay attention to what’s going on," said NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill. "If you see something that makes you uncomfortable, make that phone call or talk to a cop. Give us a chance to investigate."

Commuters can expect heightened security during their Tuesday commutes, as officials say they want to reassure riders that subways are safe.

Mayor Bill de Blasio rode the subway Monday afternoon.

"New Yorkers won't be deterred," his spokesperson explained.

The latest transit information will be posted on Twitter on NYCT SubwayNJTransitPANYNJPABusTerminal, and PATHTrain/PATHAlerts as they become available.