Storm that almost became Irma soaks NYC; Harvey remnants arrive by Sunday

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Rain associated with a disorganized tropical system in the Carolinas that almost became Tropical Storm Irma moved into the region on Tuesday afternoon.

What could’ve become Irma is failing to create a closed circulation, meaning it won't reach tropical-storm status. That said, the storm will continue to bring rain, some wind, and rough surf  to the tri-state region.

The storm is expected to track some 200-300 miles to the south and east of New York, keeping rain in the forecast through much of the night. Winds may continue to gust to 30 mph at times though the night.

Rainfall totals will be around .50-.75” across the city, but points south and east will receive higher amounts, with over one inch possible

Along the coast, the biggest impact will be the high surf that will batter the beaches, causing some erosion. Coastal Flooding doesn’t not seem to be an issue with this storm as water levels are expected to stay below the benchmarks.

Skies clear out Wednesday as high pressure briefly moves in for the day. Temperatures will climb back into the mid to upper 70s. By Thursday, temperatures climb back into the lower 80s, but a cold front could bring a line of scattered showers and thunderstorms in the afternoon.

Closing out the week, cooler air moves in behind the front. Under clear skies, temperatures will struggle to reach the 70s in the afternoon.

For the quick Labor Day weekend, Saturday looks dry but will remain on the cool side. Temperatures will be in the lower 70s.

We will be watching to see what becomes of the remnants of Harvey. Far from what it's done to Texas, Harvey in our area will bring scattered showers and thunderstorms on Sunday as the system gets picked up by a cold front. Highs will be at around 80.

The sun returns on Monday with highs in the lower 80s for the last official beach day of the season.

Further out, low pressure is developing off the coast of Africa in the Cape Verde Islands, a region that produces strong hurricanes this time of year, making it of significant interest to us. Right now, it could follow a track to the Caribbean, but it's simply too soon to know what this system will do. There is an 80 percent chance that it could form into a tropical depression in the next two days.

Mr. G has a more detailed discussion of this potential threat in the video above.  And here is the outlook on this system from the National Hurricane Center.

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