No ‘public health threat’ after massive Hillsborough warehouse fire; investigation underway

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HILLSBOROUGH, Brooklyn – As smoke continued to rise from a mammoth 500,000 square foot fire at a warehouse facility fifty miles south of Manhattan, Dr. Glen Belnay, the health officer the Township of Hillsborough said there's no health hazard to worry about.

"We are very confident there is no public health threat," Belnay said.

"There were a number of businesses back in the area, some of it was furniture related, we had food materials,"said Frank Delcore,the Hillsborough Township Mayor. "There was some office supplies as well as one of things you are seeing related to the large smoke plume which is plastic pellets."

The fire began Thursday afternoon and roared throughout the night as it lit up the area for miles. 

The exact cause or location where the fire ignited is unknown,  but since it is on federal land --- a former military base that stored goods during the Vietnam War as well as World War II --- the bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms is on the scene as a result.

However, as of Friday afternoon an investigation was still on hold.

"This is still an active fire scene as far as fighting the fire, so we haven't even begun to do anything with that yet," said Chris Weniger of the Hillsborough Fire Department.

Dozens of firefighters stretching from five counties collaborated in a mutual aid effort to contain the fire. 

Officials say there were  several challenges presented and as a result, one group that may be scrutinized is the company that leases the facility Quadro Realty. 

Weniger had this response when asked about the company:

"We voiced our concerns on numerous occasions to Quadro Realty all the way back probably ten years ago, they did make some improvements to the site, however the water pressure issues we are having, the age and the type of sprinkler systems installed to date had not been updated to today's standards."