Rubio in firing line at GOP debate

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Marco Rubio is under fire at the final Republican presidential debate ahead of next Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Marco Rubio is under fire at the final Republican presidential debate ahead of next Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Chris Christie blasted the Florida senator as someone who delivers soaring speeches but has never made a consequential decision in his political life and isn’t fit to be president. The New Jersey governor, who is desperate for a strong result in New Hampshire to keep his campaign alive, lashed away at the first-term senator who is surging after a strong third place finish in Iowa and a climb to second place in polls in the Granite State.

“You have not been involved in a consequential decision,” Christie said at the ABC debate at St. Anselm’s College in New Hampshire, portraying Rubio as an inexperienced senator who thought more about making speeches than governing and who had a poor attendance record in the Senate.

“That’s not leadership, that’s truancy,” Christie said.

Rubio tried to blunt Christie’s attack by saying that he had not wanted to leave the campaign trail to return to New Jersey before a major recent snow storm last week. The senator then spoke of the aspirations of the American people.

But Christie had none of it, refusing to let Rubio wriggle out of his assault, playing on a narrative advanced by Rubio’s opponents that he has simply learned a soaring stump speech and deploys it every time he appears in public, be it at a campaign event or a debate.

“There it is, the memorized 20 second speech,” Christie told the crowd.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush piled on, saying that Americans shouldn’t gamble on a candidate who doesn’t have executive experience.

“Marco Rubio is a gifted politician and he may have the skills to be president of the United States,” Bush said.

But he compared Rubio to Obama, who entered the White House without executive experience.

Ben Carson, meanwhile, laid into Ted Cruz after a skirmish in the aftermath of the Iowa caucuses.

CNN reported on Monday that the retired neurosurgeon planned to go home to Florida after the Iowa caucuses, rather than flying straight to New Hampshire or South Carolina, where the next primary contests are held. His aides emphasized that he is not suspending his campaign — rather, just briefly going home to “get a fresh set of clothes.”

But the Cruz campaign reacted to the news by incorrectly telling precinct captains — while the caucuses were still taking place — that the move signaled Carson would be dropping out of the race.

Carson said Saturday that the actions of Cruz’s campaign were an example of “Washington ethics” as he tried to portray himself and not Cruz as a true outsider candidate.

Cruz tried to defuse the clash by saying, “Ben, I am sorry.”

The debate started bizarrely with several candidates, including Trump and Carson apparently not hearing their introduction amid the noise of the crowd at St. Anselm’s College. Both stood awkwardly in the wings as other candidates including Rubio and Bush pushed past them. Then Ohio Gov. John Kasich apparently was not introduced at all, and had to be called on stage by moderator moderator David Muir.

Trump is back on stage after boycotting the last GOP debate over a dispute with Fox News. Cruz, meanwhile, hopes to build on his win in the Iowa caucuses and the debate could be a last stand for candidates like Bush, Kasich and Christie.

The latest CNN/WMUR tracking poll of likely Republican primary voters published Friday found Trump dominating the race with a fierce battle for second unfolding between Rubio at 17%, and Cruz and Kasich, who are tied for third place with 13%. The three, however, are within the poll’s margin of error of 5.8 percentage points.

Bush and Christie, meanwhile, are trailing in the low single digits.

One candidate not taking part on Saturday night is Carly Fiorina. The former businesswoman did not satisfy polling criteria set by ABC News and says the game was rigged against her because she beat Christie and Kasich in Iowa, and they will be on the stage and she won’t.

Christie, Kasich and Bush know there may be a spot for only one of them as the race leaves New Hampshire on Tuesday night, so time is running out.

The candidates seized on a long range missile test by North Korea minutes before the debate opened to portray the Obama administration as weak on foreign policy and to promised to have a much more robust posture in the world.

Cruz used the test to argue that the administration’s nuclear deal with Iran was foolhardy because he said it would lead to Tehran getting the same kind of nuclear arsenal that Pyongyang currently had.

And Christie used the test to slam Obama as so week “so weak,” adding that Hillary Clinton, who is seeking to succeed Obama, “would be even weaker.”

Rubio also found himself under a withering attack from Christie over immigration reform and the legislation he backed in the Senate for a comprehensive overhaul of the system that he eventually repudiated.

“The legislation passed but it had no support,” Rubio said, trying to explain his position on the issue which has become a vulnerability for him in the Republican primary amid grass roots fury over illegal immigration.

Christie piled on again, accusing Rubio of abandoning his legislation when it became clear it would be a political liability — a move he said was typical of Washington.

“It is abundantly clear that he didn’t fight for his legislation,” Christie said.

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