Video shows Chicago cop shooting Ronald Johnson; no charges filed

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CHICAGO — The latest developments in the city of Chicago's efforts to deal with fatal police shootings and police accountability (all times local):

12:10 p.m.

A grainy dashcam video shows Ronald Johnson III running across a street at night with several officers in pursuit. One officer begins shooting — fire flaring from the barrel — as Johnson runs. Prosecutors say he was hit just as his image goes out of view.

At a news conference Monday, Assistant State's Attorney Lynn McCarthy slowed down the video to show what she says is a gun in the 25-year-old black man's hand. She says it is a semiautomatic pistol with 12 live rounds loaded.

No audio was captured in the video, as in an earlier police shooting case. The lack of audio in the video showing the shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald raised questions about whether officers might have switched audio off intentionally to conceal their actions.

McCarthy says officers repeatedly shouted at Johnson to stop and drop his weapon but that he ignored these commands.

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11:55 a.m.

A Chicago police officer will not be charged in the fatal shooting of a black man in an incident captured by a squad car's dashcam.

Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez announced Monday that she's not charging Officer George Hernandez in the shooting death of Ronald Johnson III in October 2014. Less than two weeks ago another officer was charged in the fatal shooting of a black man recorded by a squad car dashcam.

Last month, Alvarez charged Jason Van Dyke with first-degree murder in the death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was shot 16 times.

Police say the 25-year-old Johnson pointed a gun at officers before Hernandez shot him in the back. Johnson's mother, who has been pressing the city to release the video, says it shows her son was running away from officers when he was shot.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel says the video should be released this week.

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This item has been corrected to show that Hernandez is not the second officer to be charged.

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11:45 a.m.

The State's Attorney's Office has shown a video of a white Chicago police officer fatally shooting a young black man — the second such video to be released in as many weeks.

The video's release Monday follows an effort by the family of 25-year-old Ronald Johnson III to force the city to make public the video that they say shows an officer shooting him in the back. Prosecutors have not said if they will charge Officer George Hernandez in the shooting.

Nearly two weeks ago, the city released a video that shows the fatal shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was shot 16 times. Officer Jason Van Dyke has been charged with first-degree murder.

Police say Johnson pointed a gun at police before Hernandez killed him. Johnson's mother says her son was running away from police when he was killed.

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10:20 a.m.

Illinois lawmakers are pushing legislation to make it easier to see videos depicting shootings by police.

The legislation, introduced by Chicago Democrat Rep. Arthur Turner, would require police agencies who want to deny release of a video under the Freedom of Information Act to prove their case in court.

The Chicago Tribune is reporting that Turner's legislation has support from co-sponsor Rep. David McSweeney, a Republican from Barrington Hills.

The two met last month when Chicago police released the video of the police shooting of black 17-year-old Laquan McDonald.

A citizen denied records under FOIA may challenge the decision in court. McSweeney says the legislation puts that action upfront because of the delay in releasing the McDonald video.

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10:10 a.m.

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan says she's pleased the U.S. Department of Justice will investigate use of force by the Chicago Police Department.

Madigan was among several politicians, including Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, who have called for a federal civil rights investigation following the release last week of a video showing a white police officer shooting a black man 16 times. The officer has been charged with murder and the city's police chief was forced to resign.

Madigan says the investigation is the "best hope" for reforms necessary to build trust. She says independent experts are the only ones who can answer questions about department practices and procedures.

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin says the investigation shouldn't be viewed as a penalty but rather an opportunity to identify areas where Chicago police have "fallen short."

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9:40 a.m.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is welcoming a U.S. Department of Justice civil rights investigation into the city's police department less than two weeks after a video of a police shooting of a teenager was released.

In a statement released minutes after U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced the investigation, Emanuel says his goal to create a stronger and better police force "that keeps the community safe while respecting the civil rights of every Chicagoan."

Emanuel had initially resisted the probe, saying it was not necessary given the fact that the U.S. Attorney's office was investigating the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by Officer Jason Van Dyke.

Van Dyke was charged last week with first-degree murder for the 2014 shooting and the mayor forced Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy to resign.

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9:15 am

Attorney General Loretta Lynch has announced a federal civil rights investigation of the Chicago police department.

The investigation will search for patterns of unconstitutional policing practices throughout the police force.

The announcement comes nearly two weeks after the city released the explosive video of a white Chicago police officer shooting a black teenager 16 times, killing him.

The investigation will be led by the Justice Department's civil rights division.

Its focus goes beyond the October 2014 shooting death of Laquan McDonald to look at the police force's policies on use of force, including racial, ethnic and other disparities, and its accountability systems.

The investigation is similar to ones recently undertaken in other cities, including Baltimore and Ferguson, Missouri. A Justice Department investigation of the Cleveland police force ended earlier this year in a sweeping settlement.

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8:15 a.m.

A law enforcement official says U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch is going to announce a civil rights investigation of the Chicago Police Department.

The official says Lynch will make the announcement with the U.S. Attorney in Chicago, Zachary Fardon, at a news conference in Washington on Monday morning. The official is not authorized to speak about the announcement and would only speak to Associated Press reporter Don Babwin on condition of anonymity.

The announcement comes nearly two weeks after the city released the explosive video of a white Chicago police officer shooting black teenager Laquan McDonald 16 times and killing him.

Officer Jason Van Dyke has been charged with first-degree murder and Mayor Rahm Emanuel forced Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy to resign.

Emanuel also says the city will release of another video that shows an officer shooting and killing a black man. Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez, whose office charged Van Dyke, has said she's launched a criminal investigation into the shooting.

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7:15 a.m.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel plans to address police accountability in a news conference with his new interim police superintendent and the acting head of the city agency that investigates police cases.

The mayor's office says Emanuel, interim Chicago Police Superintendent John Escalante and acting Independent Police Review Authority chief Sharon Fairley will speak to reporters Monday afternoon.

Last week, Emanuel fired police superintendent Garry McCarthy amid controversy over a video showing a white police officer fatally shooting a black teenager 16 times.

Late Sunday, the mayor's office said the head of IPRA had resigned effective immediately and that Fairley would take the job. She's a former federal prosecutor and was with Chicago's Office of Inspector General.

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7:10 a.m.

Prosecutors in Chicago plan a news conference to announce the results of an investigation into last year's police shooting death of 25-year-old Ronald Johnson.

Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez plans to discuss the case Monday morning. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has said the city would release a video of Johnson's killing this week.

Police say Johnson pointed a gun at officers in October 2014 before an officer fatally shot him. However, Johnson's family and attorney Michael Oppenheimer say he wasn't armed and claim a gun was planted.

Johnson's relatives have pressed Chicago officials for squad car video of the shooting and filed lawsuits.

The Johnson announcement comes after the city released graphic video last month showing a white police officer shooting 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was black, 16 times.