Traffic jams expected in Newark, Manhattan as President Obama visits

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.
US President Barack Obama disembarks from Air Force One, with One World Trade Center in the background, upon arrival at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, New Jersey, November 2, 2015. (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

US President Barack Obama disembarks from Air Force One, with One World Trade Center in the background, upon arrival at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, New Jersey, November 2, 2015. (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

NEWARK, N.J. — Anyone traveling through Newark and Manhattan Monday should expect major traffic delays as President Barack Obama visits the areas as part of his push to overhaul the criminal justice system.

Police are asking motorists to allow extra time traveling in and out of Newark between noon and 10 p.m. Monday, saying they anticipate delays and congestion in the “entire downtown area and surrounding streets” during that time.

Commuters are encouraged to use mass transit if possible.

The presidential motorcade will drive into Manhattan during the evening rush hour for Obama to attend two Democratic party events. One of the events will be in Times Square.

After the DNC event, Obama will head downtown to depart from the Downtown Manhattan Heliport to return to Washington.

Obama is calling for breaking the “cycle of incarceration” by making it easier for former inmates to successfully re-enter society. He’s scheduled to visit a drug treatment center in Newark along with New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and Newark Mayor Ras Baraka. He also plans to host a roundtable on criminal justice issues and deliver a statement at Rutgers University’s law school.

The White House says Obama will announce he’s asking the government personnel office to wait until later in the hiring process to ask about criminal histories. The Obama administration will also clarify its “one strike” rule that prevents many people with arrest records from living in public housing.

More than half a million people leave U.S. prisons each year.