SEE IT: Moon’s ‘dark side’ revealed in new NASA photos

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EPIC view from a million miles away shows Moon crossing the face of Earth! This animation shows images of the far side of the moon, illuminated by the sun, as it crosses between the DISCOVR spacecraft’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) camera and telescope, and the Earth – one million miles away. Credits: NASA/NOAA #epic #nasagoddard #moon #earth A NASA camera aboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite captured a unique view of the moon as it moved in front of the sunlit side of Earth last month. The series of test images shows the fully illuminated “dark side” of the moon that is never visible from Earth. The images were captured by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC), a four megapixel CCD camera and telescope on the DSCOVR satellite orbiting 1 million miles from Earth. From its position between the sun and Earth, DSCOVR conducts its primary mission of real-time solar wind monitoring for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Read more: www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/from-a-million-miles-away-nasa-camera-shows-moon-crossing-face-of-earth

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NEW YORK — The dark side of the moon isn’t so dark today.

A NASA camera took a series of test images showing the side of the satellite never seen from Earth. Those pictures were edited together into a short video and published Wednesday.

“It is surprising how much brighter Earth is than the moon,” said Adam Szabo, DSCOVR project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “Our planet is a truly brilliant object in dark space compared to the lunar surface.”

This image shows the far side of the moon, illuminated by the sun, as it crosses between the DSCOVR spacecraft's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) camera and telescope, and the Earth - one million miles away. (Photo credit: NASA/NOAA)

This image shows the far side of the moon, illuminated by the sun, as it crosses between the DSCOVR spacecraft’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) camera and telescope, and the Earth – one million miles away. (Photo credit: NASA/NOAA)

The images were taken by the aptly named EPIC, a camera and telescope onboard a satellite orbiting Earth from 1 million miles away, keeping a constant eye on the sunlit side of our home planet while gathering data on ozone, vegetation, cloud height and aerosols in the atmosphere.

They were snapped between 3:50 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. on July 16, NASA said.

It wasn’t until 1959 that humans had their first glimpse of the moon’s so-called dark half. That’s when Soviet Luna 3 returned with the images of the satellite’s secretive side.