Obama, after addressing Bill Cosby case, says drugging a person without consent for sex is rape

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WASHINGTON — Addressing the Bill Cosby controversy, President Barack Obama at a news conference Wednesday said there is no precedent for revoking a Presidential Medal of Freedom,  which Cosby has won, but said "any civilized country" should have no tolerance for rape.

Obama said the there is no "mechanism" for revoking the Medal of Freedom , and said he makes it a point not to comment on specific cases.  But, then, without mentioning Cosby, he said this:

"If you give a woman or a man — for that matter without his or her knowledge -- a drug, and then have sex with that person without consent, that's rape," Obama said, describing the allegations multiple women have made about Cosby's alleged methodology in sexually assaulting them.

He then added: "I think this country, and any civilized country, should have no tolerance for rape."

Former President George W. Bush awarded  Cosby the Presidential Medal of Freedom, which is the nation's highest civilian honor, in July 2002.

This is a developing story; check back for updates.