Should the MTA expand its subway etiquette rules?

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NEW YORK (PIX11) -- A prankster recently posted a very official-looking addendum to the rules of conduct in the New York City subway, voicing the silent complaints of many straphangers.

Right now, the MTA's rules of conduct include not littering, smoking, gambling and drinking, but is the list comprehensive enough? Are the posters getting out the message?

The MTA recently began new ad campaigns for sick passengers, electronic theft prevention, and the dangers of standing too close to the edge of the platform. MTA officials are not planning on revisiting the rules of conduct.

An effort to revisit the conduct rules ended with the idea being tabled by the MTA Board in 2005.

But what about the person eating hot, aromatic cart food, or that other rider clipping his finger nails?

Some other public transportation agencies have adopted an edgier etiquette campaign, like the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority's (SEPTA) new “Dude, it’s Rude” campaign. Their posters show tame messages like "watch your language" and "take your trash."

Similar, more colorful poster campaigns have popped up around the world -- they include Paris' Metro, Tokyo's Metro, and London's Underground, which features hilarious images accompanied with messages like "Steve is talking loudly to his friend on the phone. No one cares about your life Steve. Nobody loves you. Shut up."

New Yorkers like Nathan Pyle decided to take matters into their own hands. After his advisory illustrations went viral on reddit, he published "NYC Basic Tips and Etiquette" which quickly became a New York Times best seller.

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