Employers can refuse birth control based on religious objections: SCOTUS

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Corporations that hold religious objections can opt out of the new health law requirement that they cover contraceptives for female employees, the Supreme Court ruled Monday.

The justices’ 5-4 decision is the first time that the high court has ruled that profit-seeking businesses can hold religious views under federal law. And it means the Obama administration must search for a different way of providing free contraception to women who are covered under objecting companies’ health insurance plans.

Contraception is among a range of preventive services that must be provided at no extra charge under the health care law that President Barack Obama signed in 2010 and the Supreme Court upheld two years later.

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