NYC man files lawsuit seeking $2 undecillion over dog bite

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NEW YORK (PIX11) — A Manhattan man is filing a lawsuit against New York City and a laundry list of its businesses and residents for $2 undecillion over a dog bite that took off his middle finger.

So, how much exactly is he seeking? $2,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (2 followed by 36 zeros), or more money than exists on earth.

Anton Purisima filed a hand-written lawsuit in Manhattan federal court for an amount that has previously only been used as a joke (remember the Austin Powers scene when Dr. Evil travels back to the 60s and demands $100 billion in ransom and everyone laughs?).

The 22-page complaint accuses the defendants of everything from attempted murder to civil rights violations.  Not only was the dog in question “rabies-infected,’ but a “Chinese couple”  took pictures of him as he was being treated. He’s also is suing LaGuardia Airport for routinely overcharging his coffee and is suing Au Bon Pain, Hoboken University, the MTA, and thousands of people for various reasons.

In the suit, Purisima claims the pain and damages he suffered can’t be measure in money and are “priceless.” He also included a picture of his bloodied finger as evidence.

Lowering The Bar featured an excerpt from the suit:

Anton Purisima v. Au Bon Pain Store, Carepoint Health, Hoboken University Medical Center, Kmart Store 7749, St. Luke’s Emergency Dept., New York City Transit Authority, City of New York, NYC MTA, LaGuardia Airport Administration, Amy Caggiula, Does 1-1000, Case No. 1:14 CV 2755 (S.D.N.Y. filed 4/11/2014).

Civil rights violations, personal injury, discrimination on national origin, retaliation, harassment, fraud, attempted murder, intentional infliction of emotional distress, and conspiracy to defraud. $2,000 decillion ($2,000,000,000,
000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000).

Pro Se