New cuts to Food Stamp program to sting NYers before holidays

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BROOKLYN (PIX11) – Five billion dollars in federal cuts to the food stamp program known as SNAP went into effect today.

For many families, that means having to stretch an already thin budget even further, or worse, missing meals.

“We have our kids.  I’m not working right now.  And it’s help for me,” said Miranda Hasa of Bensonhurst.

Miranda Hasa’s family is no different from almost 200-thousand families in Brooklyn who depend on the SNAP program to make sure they have enough food each month.

But this month families throughout the country who depend on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program will have a little less to spend on groceries thanks to a $5 billion cut.

For individual families that means anywhere from 11 to 36 bucks less each month.

“My husband is not working every day and I need the food stamps.  I need everything,” said Luiza Meni of Bensonhurst.

And so do kids in the families that receive the benefits.

Estimates show that about half of the money from the SNAP program helps feed children.

“The prices of food are high, so I was like, ‘Were not going to buy a lot of food as we used to buy,’” Julia Chimborazo of Sunset Park. “We had to put some food back.”

“So now being cut makes it even harder for them to make a decision between eating or not eating 3 meals a day anymore,” said Thomas Neve of Reaching-Out Community Services.

Neve runs the “Reaching-Out” Community Services food pantry in Bensonhurst.
Each month he helps supplement the SNAP program for more than 5-thousand Brooklyn families.
And with the additional cuts, he says dependency on the pantry will only increase.

“It’s a challenge.  It’s greater for them and it will be for us too because more and more people will start depending on food programs to get them through.”

And that need is only expected to get worse as Republicans in Congress try to push through a bill that would cut almost $40 billion more from the program over the next 10 years.

Five billion dollars in federal cuts to the food stamp program known as SNAP went into effect today. 

For many families, that means having to stretch an already thin budget even further, or worse, missing meals. 

“We have our kids.  I’m not working right now.  And it’s help for me,” said Miranda Hasa of Bensonhurst.

Miranda Hasa’s family is no different from almost 200-thousand families in Brooklyn who depend on the SNAP program to make sure they have enough food each month.

But this month families throughout the country who depend on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program will have a little less to spend on groceries thanks to a $5 billion cut.

For individual families that means anywhere from 11 to 36 bucks less each month.

“My husband is not working every day and I need the food stamps.  I need everything,” said Luiza Meni of Bensonhurst.

And so do kids in the families that receive the benefits.

Estimates show that about half of the money from the SNAP program helps feed children.

“The prices of food are high, so I was like, ‘Were not going to buy a lot of food as we used to buy,’” Julia Chimborazo of Sunset Park. “We had to put some food back.”

“So now being cut makes it even harder for them to make a decision between eating or not eating 3 meals a day anymore,” said Thomas Neve of Reaching-Out Community Services.

Neve runs the “Reaching-Out” Community Services food pantry in Bensonhurst.
Each month he helps supplement the SNAP program for more than 5-thousand Brooklyn families.
And with the additional cuts, he says dependency on the pantry will only increase.

“It’s a challenge.  It’s greater for them and it will be for us too because more and more people will start depending on food programs to get them through.”

And that need is only expected to get worse as Republicans in Congress try to push through a bill that would cut almost $40 billion more from the program over the next 10 years.

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