Last pieces of spire hoisted to top of One World Trade Center

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The last portions of the spire that will crown the top of One World Trade Center were lifted into place Thursday amid much patriotic pride at the site of the 9/11 attack.

The pieces of the spire, now on the roof of the tower, will eventually be assembled and take One World Trade Center to the patriotic height of 1,776 feet.  The spire will serve as a broadcasting antenna. The tower measures 1,368 feet to its roof, the same height as the destroyed North Tower, which was also called One World Trade Center.

The portion of the spire is hoisted to the top of One World Trade Center.

The portion of the spire is hoisted to the top of One World Trade Center.

When completed, the tower would be the tallest in the Western Hemisphere, according to one measure.  To achieve that status, the spire would have to be considered structural, and  the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat will ultimately rule on the controversial question. (Tallness can be measured by structural height, occupied height and height to the top of a spire or antenna.)

Right now, the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere is the Willis Tower in Chicago, formerly the Sears Tower, followed by the Trump International Hotel & Tower, also in the Windy City.

Capture

The flag-draped spire element is hoisted to the top of the tower.

The World Trade Center became the tallest in New York last year, trumping the Empire State Building by 118 feet.  At one point, both the Empire State Building and the original Twin Towers were the tallest buildings in the world. The new 1 WTC doesn’t even remotely stand a chance of achieving that milestone — the tallest is now Burj Khalifa in Dubai, measuring a neck-craning 2,717 feet, almost 1,000 feet taller than 1 WTC’s final height.