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Man shoved to death under No. 7 train

A man was killed Thursday night after he was thrown onto the subway tracks.

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Despite the recent deaths of victims getting pushed from platforms, a new report suggests crime is down in subways.

Cops say thefts, robberies and assaults and down 7 percent since last summer and are also down 16 percent this year.

They say the reason for the decline is “brilliant police work” targeting hot spots, increased police presence and sting operations against iPhone thieves.

NEW YORK (PIX11) – It seems like every other day in the headlines there’s a tragedy on the subway tracks.  They involve people dying in accidents, suicides, and people being thrown to their deaths in front of trains. Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer says its a big problem that continues to grow and he wants it fixed.

Stringer is calling on the MTA’s Inspector General to investigate other systems from around the world to see how they keep the trains safe.

The request is timely.  On Tuesday, a person was killed by a train in Times Square.  Three days earlier, a man was  pronounced dead after he was hit by a train at the 23rd street, Park Avenue station. He was just one of 4 people killed on the rails in a 24 hour period.  Outside the station  riders reacted to Stringer’s call for action.

” It’s a good idea. There are too many deaths happening too many accidents,”  one rider told PIX11.  “I just saw one on TV last week.  This woman was just sitting there and this guy punched her and then threw her on the tracks. It’s pretty scary.”

PIX11 asked another rider if he was hopeful that they may have some ideas from other cities around the world that might help us here? He told us  “Sure.  It’s worth looking at.  There are big subways all over the world and a lot of people use them everyday.”  he added ” There must be a way to keep people safe, so it’s worth looking at.”

Stringer plans to press his case during a Wednesday afternoon press conference outside the Municipal Building in lower Manhattan.

PHILADELPHIA (PIX11) - A Philadelphia man has been arrested in a shocking attack.

He’s accused of throwing a woman onto the subway tracks.

The woman managed to pull herself to safety. She suffered only minor injuries.

Police say they aren’t sure why he did it,

But they believe the man may have mental health problems.

Suspect Erika Menendez screamed as she left the 112th Precinct on Saturday night.

Suspect Erika Menendez screamed as she left the 112th Precinct shortly after her arrest.

Doctors have determined the woman who allegedly pushed a man to his death in front of a subway is mentally capable of going to court.

According to cops,  Erika Menendez, 31, on Dec. 29 shoved a Queens man onto the No. 7  tracks because she thought he was Muslim.

Sunando Sen, 46, who was Hindu, was struck and killed by an oncoming train. Menedez is facing second-degree murder and hate crime charges.

A judge revealed at a hearing Monday that she was fit to stand trial. Her arraignment is set for Dec. 29.

If you’ve taken the subway chance are you’ve done it: Peaked out onto the subway tracks to see if your train is coming. Some commuters walk an even finer line along the yellow caution strip… living life out on the edge.

But after Sunando Sen was pushed to his death while waiting for the 7 train last week. It was the 54th death on the subway system tracks this year.

In light of the latest subway push death, Queens lawmakers want improvements to commuters safety, like cameras that actually work, and sliding doors to separate riders from the tracks.

Queens lawmakers want improvements to commuters safety, like sliding doors to separate riders from the tracks.

State Senator Jose Peralta and Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer say enough is enough.

That’s why the two Queens lawmakers want improvements to commuters safety, like cameras that actually work, and sliding doors to separate riders from the tracks.

And with several of these precautions already in place in other cities, straphangers agree it’s time to bring them to New York to ensure a safe commute.

31-year-old Erika Menendez walked out of the 112th Precinct in Forest Hills, charged with murder as a hate crime.

Police tell PIX11 she is the woman in this surveillance video seen running from No. 7 train station in Queens, .moments after pushing Sunando Sen onto the tracks as the train entered the station.

Sunando Sen, 46, was waiting for the 7 train when police say, Menendez came up behind him and shoved him onto the tracks.

Sunando Sen, 46, was waiting for the 7 train when police say, Menendez came up behind him and shoved him onto the tracks.

More chilling is the statement Menendez allegedly made to police.

“I pushed a Muslim off the train tracks ..because I hate Hindus and Muslims….ever since 2001 when they put down the Twin Towers, I’ve been beating them up.”

Sen’s funeral arrangements are being prepared at a funeral home in Rego Park while Menendez under goes a psychiatric evaluation.

The Queens District Attorney says Menendez was incoherent at her arraignment. At one point she was laughing out loud, out of control. If convicted, she faces 25 years to life in prison.

Forest Hills, Queens- Police have arrested a Queens woman and charged her with Second Degree Murder, as a Hate Crime, in connection to the subway shoving death of a Sunando Sen, 46, of Queens.

The Queens District Attorney says the woman is Erika Menendez, 31, of Rego Park, Queens.

With her hands cuffed behind her back, Menendez was screaming when she saw the cluster of cameras awaiting her transfer from the 112th Precinct to Queens Criminal Court on Saturday night.

Menendez’ family refused to talk with PIX11 at her Rego Park apartment complex, where a resident says she lives with her mother and stepfather.

Suspect Erika Menendez screamed as she left the 112th Precinct on Saturday night.

Suspect Erika Menendez screamed as she left the 112th Precinct on Saturday night.

While some reports point to a history of mental illness, police will not comment on that.

They will say, however, that Menendez admitted to pushing Sen on to the tracks, saying, “I pushed a Muslim off the train tracks because I hate Hindus and Muslims ever since 2001 when they put down the twin towers I’ve been beating them up.”

Police got Menendez’s image from surveillance video of the 40th street subway station in Sunnyside that captured the suspect running away moments after she shoved a man onto the 7 line train tracks.

Police released the video Friday and someone reportedly recognized her and tipped off  cops when they saw her in Brooklyn.

Sunando Sen, 46, was waiting for the 7 train when police say, Menendez came up behind him and shoved him onto the tracks.

Sunando Sen, 46, was waiting for the 7 train when police say, Menendez came up behind him and shoved him onto the tracks.

It was around 8pm on Thursday when Sen, a Manhattan print shop owner, was waiting for the 7 train when police say, Menendez came up behind him and shoved him onto the tracks.

He was hit by the oncoming train and died.

Sen was born in India and he was raised Hindu.

Menendez faces a maximum of 25 years to life if convicted.

shovesuspect

Police have released a sketch of the woman they say shoved a man to his death under a No. 7 train.

UPDATED: The woman suspected of pushing a man to his death at  a Queens subway station is in custody and has made statements implicating herself in the crime, according to reports.

No charges have yet been filed.

46-year-old Sunando Sen was fatally shoved off an elevated platform Thursday night, and into the path of an oncoming 7-train.

Detectives spent Friday night showing that video to commuters outside the 40th street station along Queens Boulevard.

After watching the video with an NYPD detective, commuter Francisco Velez told Pix11, “I think that she was probably just crazy. I’m trying to see if I can manage to see her face, but I really can’t.”

Adding to commuters’ worries is that Police Commissioner Ray Kelly says at this point it appears Sen didn’t even know the woman who pushed him to his death — and never saw her coming.

“We believe he was looking around the corner”, said Police Commissioner Ray Kelly.

The female suspect was described as short, about 5-feet, 5-inches, heavyset, and Hispanic.

Police say several eyewitnesses recall her sitting on a bench and mumbling to herself before she suddenly got up, ran toward Sen…and pushed him in front of the train.

“Insane. I’m thinking maybe she’s not all well, mentally. I went on the train this morning, I was against the wall, I didn’t even want to move,” said commuter Carmen Suarez.  “It’s scary.”

The victim’s roommate told Pix11 that Sen — a graphic designer who immigrated from Bangladesh and opened an Upper West Side print and copy shop — had hopes of finding his bride here in the US.

M.D. Kahn told Pix11, “This is really sad, it’s breaking my heart because he’s so nice and a gentle person.”

Police are on the hunt this morning for a woman they say pushed a man they believe was a stranger onto the subway tracks in Queens.

The deadly attack took place at the 40th Street station along the 7 line at 8pm Thursday night.

danWitnesses told police they saw a heavy set Hispanic woman pacing back and forth on the platform mumbling to herself.    They say the woman than sat on a bench and leaped up when the train was pulling into the platform and pushed the unsuspecting man onto the tracks.

It happened so fast and the train was so close, no one on the platform could react and help the man.  He was pronounced dead on the scene.

The 40th Street station remained closed during the overnight hours and reopened around 6am.

Cops released surveillance video from a nearby restaurant that shows the woman running away. She is described as a Hispanic woman in her twenties wearing a ski jacket and Nike sneakers.

If you have any information on the woman, call Crimestoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS.

A man was killed Thursday night after he was thrown onto the subway tracks.

Now police are looking for the woman who pushed him.

 

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