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10 dead, 10 hurt in Texas high school shooting: governor

SANTA FE, Texas — Ten people are dead and 10 more are wounded after a shooting at a high school in the town of Santa Fe, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said.

Abbott called Friday's shooting "one of the most heinous attacks that we've ever seen in the history of Texas schools."

He said explosive devices had been found in the suspected shooter's home and a vehicle as well as around the school and nearby.

The governor said the suspect, idenfitied as 17-year-old Dimitrios Pagourtzis, said he originally intended to take his own life but gave himself up and told authorities that he didn't have the courage to take his own life.

Abbott said there are "one or two" other people of interest being interviewed about the shooting.

The school went on lockdown around 8 a.m.

Aerial footage showed students standing in a grassy field and three medical helicopters landing at the school in Santa Fe, a city of about 13,000 residents roughly 30 miles southeast of Houston.

School officials said law enforcement officers worked to secure the building and moved students to another location. Students were being transported to another location to reunite with their parents.

One student told Houston television station KTRK in a telephone interview that a gunman came into her first-period art class and started shooting. The student said she saw one girl with blood on her leg as the class evacuated the room.

"We thought it was a fire drill at first but really, the teacher said, 'Start running,'" the student told the television station.

The student said she did not get a good look at the shooter because she was running away. She said students escaped through a door at the back of the classroom.

Authorities did not immediately confirm that report.

The U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said it was responding to the shooting.

This was the nation's deadliest school shooting since the February attack in Parkland, Fla., that killed 17 people and re-energized the gun-control movement after surviving teens launched a campaign for reform.

In the aftermath of the Feb. 14 attack on Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, survivors pulled all-nighters, petitioned city councils and state lawmakers, and organized protests in a grass-roots movement.

Within weeks, state lawmakers adopted changes, including new weapons restrictions. The move cemented the gun-friendly state's break with the National Rifle Association. The NRA fought back with a lawsuit.

In late March, the teens spearheaded one of the largest student protest marches since Vietnam in Washington and inspired hundreds of other marches from California to Japan.