4 tourists attacked with acid in Paris are Boston College students

People walk in the Saint-Charles railway station in Marseille south France, on the day of a nation-wide strike. French unions launch open-ended strikes in public transport (SNCF, RATP, ...), power utilities and elsewhere, education, hospitals, in a major test for President Nicolas Sarkozy's reform plans. They protest against the scrapping of pension privileges that allow some public employees to retire as early. AFP-PHOTO BORIS HORVAT (Photo credit should read BORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images)

PARIS– The Marseille prosecutor’s office said a woman has been arrested after attacking four women tourists with acid in Marseille’s main train station.

Two of the tourists were injured in the face in the attack in the city’s main Saint Charles train station and one of them has a possible eye injury, a spokesperson for the Marseille prosecutor’s office told The Associated Press.

They have been identified as students at Boston College in Massachusetts.

She said all four of the tourists, who are in their 20s, have been hospitalized, two of them for shock. She said a 41-year-old female suspect has been arrested.

French prosecutors are not investigating the acid attack as an act of terror.

Boston College said in a statement Sunday that the four female students were treated for burns at a Marseille hospital after they were sprayed in the face with acid on Sunday morning. The statement said the four all were juniors studying abroad, three of them at the college’s Paris program.

The director of the college’s Office of International Programs, Nick Gozik, said the women have been released from the hospital and “it appears that the students are fine, considering the circumstances.”

The students were identified as Courtney Siverling, Charlotte Kaufman, Michelle Krug and Kelsey Korsten.

A State Department spokesperson told PIX11 News they are aware of the situation and that the safety of abroad U.S. citizens is a top priority.

“We are aware of the reports regarding four U.S. citizens attacked in Marseille, France. The safety and security of U.S. citizens abroad is one of the State Department’s highest priorities. Due to privacy considerations, we have no further comment,” said a State Department spokesperson.

There was no immediate information on where the US tourists were from.

Marseille is a port city in southern France that is closer to Barcelona than Paris.

In previous incidents in Marseille, a driver deliberately rammed into two bus stops last month, killing a woman, but officials said it wasn’t terror-related.

In April, French police say they thwarted an imminent “terror attack” and arrested two suspected radicals in Marseille just days before the first round of France’s presidential election. Paris prosecutor Francois Molins told reporters the two suspects “were getting ready to carry out an imminent, violent action” on French territory.