WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT SUSPECTED SUBWAY BOMBER

Dissolve of DACA concerns ‘dreamers’ who have lived in U.S. longer than their homeland

NEW YORK — "I always love this county and I still love this country. Even after the president's decision today, I still love this country."

This is the passionate voice of a person who desperately wants to be an American, and who for the last 15 years has lived her life on the road to the American Dream. She has worked hard, acclimating herself while embracing a new culture as well as a new language and, as she proudly boasts, contribute to the system by paying taxes.

"I'm not a criminal. I have a job. I have a child and I don't take anything from anyone. I am not a criminal."

Yet on Tuesday night, PIX11 had to blur this Latina's face because she is afraid of being treated as just that — a criminal. This comes as a result of President Donald Trump's administration announcing the end to Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

When asked if America has been good to her, she quickly responds, "Yes, and I have to be good to America, too. We have to give back to this country and that is what I am doing right now."

Since arriving to the U.S. as a minor at 15 years old, she has contributed financially and professionally. She has earned a master's degree and works in the health industry.

"I work in the health field, and I think I help people instead of hurting people."

However, on Tuesday morning, she was the one who was hurting.

After news of the DACA dissolve broke, her 5-year-old daughter saw her shedding tears; the American Dream is now, potentially, the new American nightmare.

"She asked me this morning, 'Why I was crying?' I couldn't tell her why, but, I mean I have to give her a good example; I have to keep fighting and when she grows up she will see that I am a good women and she would be a good woman, too."