Father turns in his son after finding stolen weapons, homemade explosives

O’FALLON, Mo. — A teenager in Missouri is charged with possession of stolen guns and materials to make homemade explosives after his father turned him in to police, authorities said.

Police arrested Tristan Blasius, 17, on May 9 after his father discovered weapons, including knives, firearms, ammunition, and materials to manufacture “homemade” explosives in their basement, CNN affiliate KMOV reports.

Investigators from O’Fallon pPolice and the St. Charles County bomb squad responded to the home and found seven homemade devices along with an “old peanut butter jar full of fertilizer,” according to the charging documents.

Members of the bomb squad determined the devices to be “functional improvised explosive devices designed to throw fragmentation upon detonation,” investigators said.

Blasius’ family described the devices as more like fireworks. In a statement provided to KMOV, they said, “Tristan has been very cooperative. We are doing everything we can to work through this as a family.”

After his arrest, police said Blasius admitted to stealing all the firearms from homes in St. Charles County.

A police report reveals other information the suspect allegedly told officers:

“During the interview, Blasius told me that he had researched ammonium nitrate explosives. Blasius explained he had an old peanut butter jar of fertilizer that he has used the fertilizer in an attempt to detonate this type of explosive but it failed.”

Blasius is charged with two felonies, including unlawful possession of an illegal weapon and stealing firearm/explosive weapon/Ammonium Nitrate. In Missouri, 17-year-olds are charged as adults. The teen does not have any prior record, according to court documents.

Investigators told KMOV News 4 the teen was not attending schools, and at this point there is no indication of an intended target or a suggestion of what he planned to do with the explosives and weapons.

Blasius remains in St. Charles County Jail held on $25,000 bond.