Trump administration puts Iran ‘on notice’ for missile test

National Security Adviser Michael Flynn answers questions in the briefing room of the White House February 1, 2017 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

National Security Adviser Michael Flynn answers questions in the briefing room of the White House February 1, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump’s national security adviser says the administration is putting Iran “on notice” after it tested a ballistic missile.

“Recent Iranian actions, including a provocative ballistic missile launch and an attack against a Saudi naval vessel conducted by Iran-supported Houthi militants, underscore what should have been clear to the international community all along about Iran’s destabilizing behavior across the Middle East,” Michael Flynn told reporters Wednesday.

Flynn said the Trump administration condemns such actions that “undermine security, prosperity and stability throughout and beyond the Middle East that puts American lives at risk.”

The ballistic missile launch is in defiance of UN Security Council Resolution 2231. The resolution prohibits Iran from test-firing missiles that could be used to deliver nuclear weapons.

He says “Iran is now feeling emboldened,” criticizing the Obama administration for failing “to respond adequately.” Flynn mentioned Trump’s criticism of the various agreements reached by Iran and the Obama administration, calling it “weak an ineffective.”

Flynn says that “we are officially putting Iran on notice,” although it’s not clear what he meant.

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif would not confirm the launch in a news conference on Tuesday, The Washington Post reports. Zarif said the missiles are “designed to carry a normal warhead in the field of legitimate defense” and is not capable of carrying a nuclear warhead.

A defense official said this week that the missile test ended with a “failed” re-entry into the earth’s atmosphere. The missile reportedly traveled about 600 miles before exploding.

The official had no other details, including the type of missile. The official was not authorized to discuss the matter and spoke on condition of anonymity.