Investigators will not determine cause of LIRR derailment while on scene: NTSB

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NEW YORK — NTSB officials say it will be several days before they determine what caused a Long Island Rail Road train to derail in Brooklyn Wednesday morning injuring more than 100 people.

Investigators say they will be on the scene of the derailment for three to seven days.

"We will not be determining probable cause of the accident while on scene," an NTSB official said Wednesday night.

Event recorders have been recovered and will be analyzed over the next few days.

Fire officials at the scene said metal that appeared to be from a rail pierced the bottom of the train and the wheels lifted up. They said the crash also damaged a work area beyond the tracks.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the train was moving very slowly. He said it "wasn't really a derailment."

Eleven of the injured were taken to hospitals. Officials at the scene estimated that 600 to 700 people were on the train.
An NTSB official said the speed for the area where the train derailed was limited to 5 miles per hour.

Gov. Cuomo told reporters the person with the most significant injury was a woman with a possible broken leg.

The NTSB said they are "interested in what witnesses will have to say about the accident." Any witnesses with videos or photos are urged to email witness@ntsb.gov.

The crash comes less than four months after a woman was killed and more than 100 injured when a train barreled into Hoboken Terminal.

Since 2000, there have been more than 70 people killed in commuter train crashes.