Attacker killed, 11 hospitalized in Ohio State University attack

COLUMBUS, Ohio —The Ohio State University student who carried out a knife attack on campus Monday said in a Facebook post he was "sick and tired" of seeing fellow Muslims "killed and tortured," according to federal law enforcement officials.

Investigators are examining Abdul Razak Ali Artan's Facebook page to determine whether the attack was terrorism, though law enforcement officials said it will take time to ascertain motive.

In a Facebook post shortly before the Monday morning rampage, the Somali immigrant urged America "to stop interfering with other countries, especially the Muslim Ummah," a term for Muslim people at large.

"By Allah, we will not let you sleep unless you give peace to the Muslims. You will not celebrate or enjoy any holiday."

Artan allegedly hit pedestrians with a vehicle then slashed them with a butcher knife.

Ohio State Police Officer Alan Horujko shot Artan after he failed to obey orders to stop.

An active shooter was reported at Ohio State University on Nov. 28, 2016. (WCMH)

An active shooter was reported at Ohio State University on Nov. 28, 2016. (WCMH)

At least nine people have been taken to hospitals with stab wounds and wounds consistent with being hit by a vehicle, according to a Columbus Fire Department official and a campus spokesman.

It was about 9:52 a.m. when campus police were called about a vehicle that purposely drove over a curb and into pedestrians on West 19th Avenue in front of Watts Hall, which houses the Materials Science and Engineering department.

A minute later, a campus police officer reported they had fired at the driver who allegedly exited the car and slashed multiple individuals, said Monica Moll, OSU's director of public safety.

A butcher knife was recovered at the scene, OSU Police Chief Craig Stone said.

The suspect has been identified as OSU student Abdul Razak Ali Artan, Moll said. Artan was born in Somalia and living in the United States as a legal permanent resident, the Associated Press reports. It's unclear when he came to the U.S.

Artan acted alone in the Monday morning violence, Stone said.

Initially the university's Department of Public Safety announced in a tweet that an active shooter had been reported at Watts Hall. But there is no indication the attacker used a gun, Columbus Police Chief Kim Jacobs said at a 1 p.m. news conference.

Students were told to "Run Hide Fight," a standard protocol for an active shooter situation. The directive means flee and take shelter if you can, but try to disrupt the attacker if your life is in imminent danger.

A shelter-in-place order put in place at 10 a.m. was lifted at 11:30 a.m., the campus said, saying the "scene is now secure." All classes were canceled on the Columbus campus for the rest of the day, but will resume on their normal schedule Tuesday.

Rachel Lemaster, who works for OSU engineering advising, was in the Old Koffolt Building. She was outside for about 20 minutes for a fire drill prior to being ordered to shelter in place.

She and three co-workers "hunkered down" in the chemical engineering building on the second floor, "above the chaos," she said.

"It's not real," she said choking back tears. "You go numb. It's not supposed to happen."

Lemaster said she tried to pick up her van from a parking garage but was turned away. She said she saw a body "outside the loading dock" at that garage.

Students were told to avoid the area of College and wait for police officers to give them directions.

An active shooter was reported at Ohio State University on Nov. 28, 2016. (WBNS)

An active shooter was reported at Ohio State University on Nov. 28, 2016. (WBNS)

"Please contact Police / 9-1-1 only if you have information," the school's public safety officials tweeted.

Video from the scene showed heavily armed officers canvassing the area, with some people who appeared to be students being escorted by officers.

Among the agencies responding are FBI Cincinnati and Columbus police. Ohio State University Police Department is the lead agency.

With nearly 60,000 students at its main campus, Ohio State is one of the nation's largest universities.

"We're an enormous campus. It was bound to happen one day," Lemaster told CNN. "It's just horrible it did."

Graduating senior Yoon Lee told WGMH he was "shocked" by what unfolded at his university.

"I heard, like, multiple gunshots, and I wasn't sure if it was real or not but as soon as I looked out the window, but I saw the scene, I saw it was really happening," Lee said.

The incident comes as students and staff returned to campus following a long holiday weekend. No classes have been held since last Wednesday, according to the school's academic calendar.

The Associated Press  and CNN contributed to this report.