6 shooting deaths in 72 hours is just another normal 3-day stretch for some Newark residents

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NEWARK, N.J. -- For some Newark residents, six shooting deaths within 72 hours is just another normal week.

"That's normal for us. That's normal. Anytime of the year really, but in the summertime you are going to catch... there is a lot of homicides."

For 21-year-old Ty, a conversation into what life has been like in Newark's South Ward for an outsider can be eyeopening.

When asked how old he was when his mother first sat him down telling him he has to watch out for the streets -- Ty quickly responds, "When I was one. As soon I was able to understand what she was saying, one-years-old young, you learn young."

The violence that has crippled neighborhoods in this city of late is unfortunately a bit too routine for Ty. When asked how many people he knows have been lost to gun violence, he simply responds, "You talking about this year alone or overall?"

Eventually he shares, "I say I am in double-digits at least ... like 12."

Now imagine for one second if you knew 12 people who were shot and killed?

This is real life for some in Newark. Which is why the news of six shooting deaths, some coming during what the city of was touting as "24 hours of Peace" is shocking for many, but not for Ty and those who call these tree-lined streets home.

"This ---- is sad, six homicides. For people on the outside, me saying it's normal, it's like 'What you mean?,' you ain't going to understand what I am saying. But for people from here who are going to watch this and are from Newark, they are going to be like yeah this ---- is normal, there is nothing different."

Council member John James, who lives and represents the South Ward, says that stats indicate most triggermen in Newark are over the age of 24 years old.

However, what the stats do not show, is what a shooter is made of.

"A lack of civility, a lack of respect for human life, maybe self-hatred, that you have to take someone out to make yourself feel good or to prove a point and that is a poor way to live a life," James said.