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Politicians weigh in on terrorist attacks in Paris

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NEW YORK— As French fighter jets bomb ISIS in Syria, U.S. leaders are pledging support for France and some are calling for ramped up attacks on the Islamic State.

At the G20 Summit in Turkey today, a forum traditionally focused on global economic policy, leaders condemned the attacks on France. President Obama said, “we stand in solidarity with them in hunting down the perpetrators of the crime and bringing them to justice.”

The President said that the U.S. has been going after ISIS in Syria and Iraq, while trying to unseat Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad. Syria's collapse into civil war over four years ago created a hotbed of lawlessness in which ISIS has been able to grow and thrive.

Donald Trump asserted that gun laws should be re-considered.

“You can say what you want but if they had guns, if our people had guns, if they were allowed to carry, it would have been a much, much different situation,” he said.

In New York this morning, Sen. Chuck Schumer said the U.S. is currently working with the French to track and identify terrorists connected to the attacks.

“It seems clear we have a new ISIL,” said Schumer. “If ISIS is aiming abroad, outside the middle east: What to do we do? We have tool to deal with this, particularly intelligence, reconnaissance, drowns, air strikes. And we should increase all four of those.”

Schumer said that America is much better at tracking terrorists and finding clues about where they may strike next, before an attack. He also said that America’s borders are much more secure and that refugees accepted into the United States are thoroughly checked. He said that thousands have fled into Europe from Syria, with their backgrounds checked only after they’ve been able to enter the European Union.

Republican candidates running for president say that the evolution of ISIS has left the U.S. with no other option.

“We should declare war,” said Governor Jeb Bush on NBC’s 'Meet the Press'. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham echoed Bush, as did Sen. Marco Rubio on ABC’s ‘This Week’.

“This was clearly an act of war,” said Rubio, "an attack on one of our NATO allies. And we should invoke Article 5 of the NATO agreement and bring everyone together to put together a coalition to confront this challenge."

While Republican contender Ben Carson said that Syrian refugees could pose a security threat.

“If we take in, you know, thousands of people from that area,” he said, " it would be almost malpractice of the global jihadists did not to infiltrate them with their people.”

Congressman Michael McCaul, Chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security, said this morning that White House now has no choice but to ramp up our involvement in the fight against ISIS. He argued that U.S. special forces should be deployed.

At last night’s Democratic Presidential Debate, a moment of silence was held for the victims of the Paris attacks, before candidates took questions on terror.

"Together, leading the world, this country will rid the planet of this barbarous organization called ISIS,” said Senator Bernie Sanders.

"It can not be contained and must be defeated,” stated Secretary Clinton, "We can bring people people together in a cooperative way, but it can not be an American fight, although American leadership is essential."

No credible threat against New York or the United States has been reported.