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Home workouts go virtual with Peloton riding

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If getting fit happened through video games, I’d be a beast. Most attempts to digitally “gamify” fitness – from Wii Sports to XBOX Kinect – have fallen short, or didn’t catch on. Now, a new company may become the first to blend fitness and tech for a fully interactive, personalized workout you can do from your living room.

Meet Peloton

For the health-conscious seeking interactive fitness training without the hassle and cost of gyms or studios, Peloton is a fitness brand that has merged connective technology with at-home equipment to reinvent how we incorporate fitness into our lives and homes.

It starts with their signature bike. Designed to be aesthetically pleasing and completely silent, it’s crown jewel is a gorgeous 21.5” waterproof touch screen. It is waterproof, sweat proof, and with the tap of a finger riders can live-stream classes taking place at Peloton’s Manhattan studio.

The “smart bike” comes to your living room

Every morning, co-founder Tom Cortese hops on his Peloton bike at the foot of his bed. He throws on headphones and silently gets in a complete high-energy workout. His wife sleeps peacefully just feet away.

According to Cortese, Peloton’s goal was to create a bike as functional as it is beautiful in your home. The sleek black frame is as unobtrusive as exercise equipment can get. The wheels are completely silent as they spin.

Peloton’s crown jewel is a 21.5” touch screen monitor affixed to each bike. With the tap of a finger, riders experience live classes in beautiful HD. The sweat proof screen is nearly four times the size of an Ipad. A built-in camera lets riders see and chat with friends as they ride. Auto-updating statistics let you track a variety of metrics right on the screen.

Over 10,000 Peloton bikes have already been sold to riders wanting live spin classes from the comfort of their own home. Demand for Peloton bikes has begun to outpace production capability, according to Cortese.

Live classes, from anywhere

Unlike pre-produced workout videos, Peloton classes are live. A control room beneath their 29th Street studio in Manhattan manages multiple cameras as classes stream to bikes around the country.

Classes range from ten-minute quick rides to 90-minute professional training with Tour-De-France team members. Peloton’s instructors hail from many of New York’s top spin studios.

A digital leaderboard lets riders and instructors see everyone’s progress. Instructors give real-time shout outs and encouragement to participants. The relationships developed between teacher and out-of-town riders is as personal as what they experience with New York based riders, according to instructor Lisa Niren.

On demand and still interactive

Peloton fits your schedule by letting riders tune in to classes on-demand, even after their live start time. Every live class is archived in Peloton’s digital library. Riders can see the progress of previous riders as the class progresses. Your score still counts in the final leaderboard.

Saving you money

Peloton’s stationary bike costs $1,995. It comes fully equipped with the 21.5” HD touch screen monitor and always-updating software. A membership of $39/month gives your bike unlimited access to unlimited content and live-streams for unlimited users in your family.

The total first year cost of Peloton is $2,463 before tax.

For comparison, the average price of a spin class in New York City is between $20-40 per class. Assuming your commute cost is as low as $5.50 (the round trip price of a subway ride,) that’s $25.50 per class. If you take two classes per week, your annual cost comes in at $2,652.

That’s $189 in savings the first year, including the upfront cost of the bike. By the second year you are saving $2,184. For a family with more than one fitness fan, Peloton is a no-brainer money saver.