Vast majority of NYC nannies don’t get legally-required benefits: study

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NEW YORK - A stroller might be the number one accessory if you're walking the streets of Park Slope these days.  The neighborhood has been called one of the best in the country to raise a family, so it's no surprise.  But a new survey shows that some of the people pushing those strollers may not be getting fair wages.

The Park Slope Parents group survey hundreds of parents and found that, on average, nannies in the neighborhood make more than $16 per hour.

That's almost $4 an hour more than the average across the five boroughs.

But mother Judy Chan wasn't surprised to learn parents in her neighborhood are paying top-dollar for child care.

"Many people have nannies and a lot of child care services around here, day care is really expensive, so it makes sense that early childhood would cost as much," said Chan.

The teacher still goes to work for the benefits, but that might not be case if her mother wasn't helping raise her son Jay.

"My mom pretty much does full-time child care for me."

Throw in yearly bonuses, paid transportation, additional food and the cost of child care adds up quickly.

But according to the survey, 64% of nannies work more than 40 hours per week.

88% of those parents say they don't pay their nannies overtime for the additional hours - even though they're legally required to do so.

It's an issue nannies have been dealing with for years even after the state passed the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights back in 2010.

The Park Slope Parents Group says many of the parents that do not pay their nannies overtime were unaware of the law, but added that most still gave annual bonuses to their nannies.  While overtime pay seems slow to catch on in the industry, two other points from the Domestic Workers Bill of rights - paid leave and sick-time, seem to be sticking.