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Rio’s Olympic water rife with sewage virus: AP

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RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - JULY 29:  Pollution lines the shore on Guanabara Bay, site of sailing events for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, on July 29, 2015 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Rio government promised to clean 80 percent of pollution and waste from the bay in time for the games but admits that goal now is unlikely to be reached. August 5 marks the one-year mark to the start of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.  (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – JULY 29: Pollution lines the shore on Guanabara Bay, site of sailing events for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, on July 29, 2015 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Rio government promised to clean 80 percent of pollution and waste from the bay in time for the games but admits that goal now is unlikely to be reached. August 5 marks the one-year mark to the start of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

RIO DE JANEIRO — Athletes competing in next year’s Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro will be swimming and boating in waters so contaminated with human feces that they risk becoming violently ill.

That’s according to a study commissioned by The Associated Press that tested for viral and bacterial pathogens in the waters where athletes will compete.

It is the first independent comprehensive testing for both viruses and bacteria at the Olympic sites.

Brazilians officials have insisted the water will be safe for the Olympic athletes. But the government does not test for viruses.

An expert in water risk assessments who examined the AP data said athletes have a 99 percent chance of being infected by ingesting just three teaspoons of the polluted water.

It’s not clear how many would then fall ill.