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Are ‘manspreading’ arrests just police abusing the broken windows theory?

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LOWER MANHATTAN (PIX11)-- On Wednesday, PIX11's Andrew Ramos brought you the story of Joshua Chaves, a young man fined for going through the turnstile even though he was allowed to do so by an MTA employee.

The altercation with plain clothed officers caught on his cell phone video.

Robert Gangi, the director for The Police Reform Organizing Project (PROP) said their ten month-long investigation found Chaves is not alone.

Believe it or not manspreading got one person arrested, according to PROP. Littering landed another in cuffs. The complaints and stories go on and on in PROP's report.

"People can get arrested for having their foot up on the subway seat," Gangi said. "People get arrested for walking between subway cars when the train is stopped. People get arrested for begging."

People get arrested for jaywalking," he continued to say. "People get arrested for spitting on the sidewalk. All those activities I described have been decriminalized in white communities."

Stories were largely gathered through PROP volunteers monitoring city arraignments in lower Manhattan, or by talking to people on the streets.

The activist group says its report highlights harmful effects of the city's broken window's policing.

In 2014 alone, there were hundreds of thousands of misdemeanor arrests.

According to PROP, 86 percent of those arrested involving people of color.

Gangi however, did say there are flaws in their study. There were no photographs taken or independent interviews conducted during their court monitoring that they did. There are things Gangi said they would like to revise the next time they do a similar study.

He said he hopes police move on from the quota system. He thinks that's the reason for his high number of misdemeanor arrests.

A request for comment from the NYPD on the study was no immediately returned.