Germanwings co-pilot researched suicide methods, cockpit door security: prosecutors

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FRANKFURT, GERMANY - MARCH 14: Andreas Lubitz participates in the Frankfurt City Half-Marathon on March 14, 2010 in Frankfurt, Germany. Lubitz is suspected of having deliberately piloted Germanwings flight 4U 9525 into a mountain in southern France on March 24, 2015 and killing all 150 people on board, including himself, in the worst air disaster in Europe in recent history.  (Photo by Getty Images)

FRANKFURT, GERMANY – MARCH 14: Andreas Lubitz participates in the Frankfurt City Half-Marathon on March 14, 2010 in Frankfurt, Germany. Lubitz is suspected of having deliberately piloted Germanwings flight 4U 9525 into a mountain in southern France on March 24, 2015 and killing all 150 people on board, including himself, in the worst air disaster in Europe in recent history. (Photo by Getty Images)

(PIX11) – German prosecutors revealed Thursday that the co-pilot who is believed to have intentionally driven a packed plane into a French mountainside had done research on suicide methods and cockpit doors.

The disturbing Internet queries were uncovered when Investigators searched Andreas Lubitz’s home computer, prosecutors said.

On Thursday, investigators announced that body parts from all 150 people had been identified, according to a French prosecutor.  The announcement follows an exhaustive, grisly examination of 2,854 pieces of human tissue found at the site.

Marseille Prosecutor Brice Robin also confirmed that the blackened and burned second black box had been found.

It's not clear if the flight recorder information is still intact, Robin called it "possibly usable."  The second black box records information generated by nearly every instrument in the plane.  Based on the recording from the first black box, prosecutors believe Lubitz intentionally locked the other co-pilot out of the cockpit in order to allow the plane to crash.