JPMorgan says data breach affected about 76M households

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NEW YORK (PIX11/AP) — In a digital age, when bank ATMs and tellers are becoming lonelier by the year – news of a data breach -- not at a retailer, but at your bank -- is truly unsettling.

It’s just been revealed the latest breach occurred this summer, at one of the nation’s largest, JPMorgan Chase.

Personal information for 76 million household, and six million business accounts, all compromised.

“It was a nightmare. It began the night before when I got a push alert on the Chase app on my phone, that said my password had been changed,” said Raj Goel, a tech analyst.

Apparently, some Chase customers, including PIX11 Executive Producer for Digital Rolando Pujol, may still be at risk.

Pujol spent hours on the phone with a Chase representative this week, trying to secure his account.

“They changed my password – I thought that was the end of it. Yesterday afternoon, I got another push alert saying the same thing. Went in, changed my password with the help of chase, they got in again. We continued to take more steps, add protection to my account – change my user id. We changed my default email. Each time within minutes, they would be able to go in, access my account – and initiate wire transfers,” said Pujol.

Goel says while Chase investigates this summer’s breach, there are steps consumers can add more eyes to watch over their hard earned money.

“Contact your bank, whether you’re a chase customer or not, and have them send you daily email and text alerts to your email and your phone with your current balances. Also have them flag any unusual transactions,” said Goel.

On its website, Chase is telling its customers while their names, addresses, phone numbers, and email addresses were compromised,  “There is no evidence that your account numbers, passwords, user IDs, date of birth or Social Security number were compromised during this attack.”

The bank adds:

- Your money at JPMorgan Chase is safe:

- Unlike recent attacks on retailers, we have seen no unusual fraud activity related to this incident.

Tell that to the person in charge of all things digital at PIX11.

“I consider myself a digitally savvy guy. But after this experience – that mattress – hiding the money under it, is looking pretty good right now. I’m going old school I’m afraid,” said Pujol.

Chase issued the following statement to customers Thursday:

We want to update you further on the cyber attack against our company.  After extensive review, here is what our forensic investigation has found to date:

Here's what you should know now:

There is no evidence that your account numbers, passwords, user IDs, date of birth or Social Security number were compromised during this attack.

However, your contact information -- name, address, phone number and email address -- was compromised.

Your money at JPMorgan Chase is safe: 

Unlike recent attacks on retailers, we have seen no unusual fraud activity related to this incident.

Importantly, you are not liable for any unauthorized transaction on your account that you promptly alert us to.

We are very sorry that this happened and for any uncertainty this may cause you.  We don't believe that you need to change your password or account information.  As always, we recommend you use care with your accounts and information, as we describe in our Security Center.

We're here to help

Attacks like these are frustrating.  There are always lessons to be learned, and we will learn from this one and use that knowledge to make our defenses even stronger.

 

For more tips on how to stay safe while online from tech analyst Raj Goel, click here.

1 Comment

  • Susan Gervasi

    I just have a mortgage account with Chase Mortgage Division. I do not bank with Chase otherwise. Any issues of identity theft within these documents in my mortgage account?

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