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Prolonged winter is turning this spring into flu season

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NEW YORK (PIX11) – As New Yorkers rejoice amid (finally) rising temperatures, a nasty side effect of the prolonged cold is being passed around — the flu.

There is a virus in the air this spring and pharmacist Ian Ginsburg says it has people walking through the doors of his pharmacy, C.O. Bigelow.  He said he’s been hearing the same thing over and over of late, “I felt great the other day and all of a sudden I don’t feel good. I’m a little feverish, my head is stuffed up, I don’t know what is wrong with me.”

Dr. Robert Glatter of Lennox Hill has seen an uptick in patients the last few weeks — which is common during the winter flu season — but this is April.  Dr. Glatter says the reason for a spike in cases this late in the season is because of the extended winter, “People stay indoors longer and because they stay indoors longer there is a greater chance that they can spread the virus among themselves.”

Pharmacy

As a result, it’s been spreading more so within the last month according to Ginsburg, “About two weeks ago it started to become… we saw it more and more and more people coming in.”

So who primarily is getting impacted according to Dr. Glatter?  “The flu itself is very severe this year, we’re seeing it in more people in the ages 18 to 64 compared to the young children and elderly.”

The reason?  The young and old are better about their vaccinations.

This said, while the flu is good business for pharmacies, Ginsburg does note that this virus has been challenging in another area, “We’ve had to restock the Tamiflu quite often and there was a shortage of the liquid Tamiflu for kids, but I think that kind of resolved itself.”

Those suffering are not only those who failed to get vaccinated but also those that did.  The flu shot prevents only 75% to 80% of flu strains.