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GM recall reopens painful wounds for parents who lost daughter

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FISHKILL, New York (PIX11) – It’s often said that for parents who lose a child, there will never be closure.

Michelle and Neil Kosilla are no different, except in their case pain is joined by the nagging lack of an explanation for what really happened in their daughter Amy’s fatal accident.

“We don’t know exactly what it was that took her off the road. There were no brake marks,” said Michelle Kosilla.

Amy was just 23-years-old, driving her Chevy Cobalt to the local firehouse in Fishkill where her boyfriend worked.

It’s the same model vehicle at the heart of a GM ignition-defect investigation unfolding on Capitol Hill.

Parents

But the Kosillas still wonder if the presence of alcohol in Amy’s system at the time of the crash led GM to deny the family’s request for financial damages, with no further explanation.

“They knew, they didn’t mention that. They just made us feel as though there were no defect with the vehicle,” said Mrs. Kosilla.

Testimony from GM’s CEO did nothing to ease the anguish of families who want answers.

There are now 13 fatalities connected to GM vehicles manufactured with a defective ignition switch.

The switch has so little resistance, it can turn off without the driver knowing, cutting power to the vehicle and the airbags.

Amy’s boyfriend at the time, Glenn Kramer – saw her that night in March 2010 and was first on the scene right after the crash.

“It’s not easy. It’s not easy fours later. I don’t’ think it’s going to be easy ten years,” said Kramer.

The Kosillas say this ordeal – through a funeral, letters, and denials should now be about General Motors making things right.