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Hurricane Sandy as it happened: Growing alarm in New York on 10/24/12 over distant storm

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On Oct. 24, Mr. G points out that there’s a slight chance tropical storm winds could affect the New York area. He notes models are conflicting, and more are placing the storm closer and closer to the tri-state area.

NEW YORK (PIX11) — It’s Oct. 24, 2012, just five days before Hurricane Sandy hit the tri-state area.

At the PIX11 Weather Center that morning,  Linda Church is realizing the storm will affect our weather, but just how it will impact us is far from certain.

Sandy was on the cusp of becoming a hurricane and hovering near Jamaica.

The National Hurricane Center at this point was still predicting the storm would eventually venture east and out to sea.

However, Linda cautioned in her PIX11 Morning News forecast that  the effects of Sandy, if any, would be felt by Monday, Oct. 29 or the next day. She was right.

“A pocket of energy moving up the Eastern seaboard, potentially bringing in some stormy weather to us beginning next week.”

Later in the day,  Mr. G is growing alarmed, with Sandy now a category one hurricane.

“A real interesting forecast coming up as computer models are going in different directions from the Hurricane Center, which I have not seen in my lifetime,” Mr. G says.

For his evening forecast, he warns about a cold front that could influence Sandy, and points out new computer models that have Sandy aiming closer  to East Coast.

According to the wind probability field model, Mr. G explains, New York City was only on the fringe of tropical storm winds from Sandy, which at the time was 150 miles south of Bermuda.

“The reason there is concern here for Sandy, which has hurricane warnings in effect for Jamaica and Cuba and a hurricane watch for the Bahamas, is going to be a nightmare because models are taking it closer to the East Coast of the United States,” Mr. G said.