New bill will require NY teachers to be trained in food allergy emergencies

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It’s a life-saving tool for anyone with serious allergies- the Epipen.   It is no doubt a lifesaving injection for someone who goes into anaphylactic shock.

Approximately one in thirteen children have food allergies across the country and unfortunately 150 kids die every year because of them.

That is why  Assemblywoman Linda Ronsenthal, State Senator Marty Golden and other concerned parents are joining forces to propose a new bill which would make it a law to train new teachers how to properly administer an Epipen .

The bill would protect children’s lives by requiring new teachers to undergo a free, 10-minute training course.  The key word here is FREE.  The state nor the school district would have to pay any fees.

Right now in New York State only a  trained school nurse is required to give an epipen if a child goes into shock from an allergy .

No teacher is legally required to give it, nor are they legally required to train how to administer it.

On Monday in Albany, parents met with a number of state leaders to get support for this bill – the hope here is that it will move forward and be brought to the Senate and Assembly floor for a vote.