2nd watermain break knocks out water to city of Hoboken

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sinkhole car

A contractor at a construction site at 14th Street and Willow Avenue in Hoboken accidentally hit a 30” water main causing a second watermain break in 8 hours, city officials said.

All or most of Hoboken is without water. United Water is working to isolate the break and restore service to residents.

The latest watermain break comes less than 8 hours after a 12-inch water main ruptured on Willow Avenue near the intersection of Eighth Street sending water gushing into nearby basements and creating a huge sink hole that nearly swallowed a silver Mazda.

Robert Costa lives on the block and got his basement flooded.

“It was about 3 in the morning.  I guess it was a water main break that kind of swallowed that car and the street flooded all the way back,” he said. “We had a foot and a half of water down there. We will wait for our management company to come in and hopefully pump everything out and then we’ll bleach everything down.”

A sinkhole formed near the break, swallowing at least one car, a Mazda. Hoboken officials say crews managed to tow at least 9 cars from the block to clear the area for heavy equipment.  They used dirt to create a ramp and towed the Mazda from the sinkhole.

The area flooded during super storm Sandy and witnesses told PIX 11 the car was a new replacement for a neighbor’s car that was destroyed in the storm.

The break disrupted water service in the area but once the car was removed from the sink hole workers from United Water began the repairs Edmund DeVeaux, The V.P.

For External Affairs told PIX11 ” We expect the actual water service to be up sometime in the afternoon.  Then we’ll do the cleaning and damage assessment which will go into the evening.”  DeVeaux says old pipes may be to blame.

“It’s just the age of the infrastructure.  At this point in the country we are looking at an average of 75 year old infrastructure.  So it’s just old infrastructure.”